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Amazing Video Roti Chapati Maker Girls Dont Have to Worry About Gol Roti

Amazing Video Roti Chapati Maker Girls Dont Have to Worry About Gol Roti

Rotis are made from different flours in India. There are various ways to prepare it. Here is a step by step process to make it with the help of an electronic roti-maker. It is not at all cumbersome to use. In fact, it is highly convenient and saves energy and time.

Amazing Video Roti Chapati Maker Girls Dont Have to Worry About Gol Roti

Chapati (alternately Chapatti, Chappati or Chapathi) is an unleavened flatbread (also known as roti) from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.It is a common staple in South Asia as well as amongst South Asian expatriates throughout the world. Versions of the dish are also found in Central Asia and the Horn of Africa, with the laobing flatbread serving as a local variation in China. Chapati is known as sapati or doday in the Pashto language.

Chapatis are made using a soft dough comprising flour (whole grain common wheat), “Atta” in Hindi/Urdu/Punjabi/Nepali/Bengali, and water. Atta is made from hard Gehun (Indian wheat, or durum).It is more finely ground than most western-style wholewheat flours. Traditionally, roti (and rice) are prepared without salt to provide a bland background for spicy dishes.This also corresponds to modern dietary recommendations not to increase salt intake more than necessary.Some families also do not add oil (that helps to make the finished product softer).

A dough is prepared with atta and water, kneaded with the knuckles of the hand made into a fist and left to prove for at least ten to fifteen minutes (sometimes as long as an hour) for the gluten in the dough to develop. After proving, the dough becomes softer and more pliable.

Watch Clip:

Small portions of the dough are pinched off and formed into round balls that are pressed between the two palms to form discs which are then dipped into flour and rolled out on a circular rolling board (chakla) using a rolling pin (velan or belan) into a perfect circle. The belan is formed differently according to region.

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